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Dinosaurs In Literature, History and Art: Shang Dynasty, Jade Dinosaur .. Page 44


This objet d'art is posted for sale on the internet. The text below is a verbatim quote from the site. It is the opinion of the sellers of this ancient Shang Dynasty object that it is a representation of a dinosaur. (This piece now is in the Genesis Park Collection

Price: $100,000

Shang Dynasty, (1766 BC and 1122 BC), Jade dinosaur H. 39cm, W. 14kgs

Some believes the mythical Chinese dragon may be the dinosaur in the Gretaceous Period. The Chinese character of Dragon has been formed by the pattern derivation which must base some thing in the real world.

If this is true, then the ancient Chinese must see the live dinosaur to compose the dragon character.

The shape of ancient character of dragon looks like the shape of dinosaur. Tyrannosaurus is the major dinosaur family of the Gretaceous period. Tyrannosaurus was one of the largest terrestrial carnivores of all time. It stood approximately 15 feet high and was about 40 feet in length, roughly six tons in weight.

In its large mouth were six-inch long, sharp, serrated teeth. The artifact has the simplified design of tyrannosaurus with only two legs.

The typical relief auspicious cloud lines in the Shang dynasty. It is made of white color nephrite with phenomena of differential weathering, cleaving veins and earth penetration.

http://www.palaceantique.com/

Contact
Adviser: Dr. Eugene Huang
PhD, Cornell University
Associate Researcher, Institute of Earth Sciences, Acadamia Sinica
Curator: Chen Ming Chieh (Mitchell Chen)
M.S. in Economics(1970), National Taiwan University Visiting Scholar(1974), Carnegie-Mellon University M.S. (1975) in Engineering , Standord University Associate Professor, DBA, Jen Wen Institute of Technology Lecturer in Jade Artifacts Indentification, Hsien-Tien Community College
Click and Drag Photo to resize. .

Charonosaurus, saurolophus and parasaurolophus were three very large lambeosaurine dinosaurs which are virtually indistinquishable from each other, at least as interpreted by artists and scientists today. All three of them had backwards pointing crests similar to the crest/horn depicted by the Chinese artist of the Shang Dynasty between 1766 BC and 1122 BC.

Here we compare the ancient Chinese piece with several depictions of lambeosaurine dinosaurs selected to most closely resemble the posture and position of the jade, Shang Dynasty piece. It will be noted that the smaller front legs aren't depicted on the piece due to what we assume is "artistic license". Even so, we maintain that it is fairly easy to identify the piece.

The similarity between this ancient piece and modern depictions of these tree hadrosaurine dinosaurs is too close to be a coincidence; the dermal crest, the backwards pointing crest and the ability to walk bipedally on two large, powerful legs.

Saurolophus, left, Shang Dynasty piece, right. Click and Drag Photo to resize. .

This "dinosaur" features scaled skin and a long tail that helped the bipedal dinosaurs balance themselves. It appears as though these lambesaurine dinosaurs, which lived on the North American continent as well as in Asia continued to live at least between 3,700 and 3,100 years ago.

Charonosaurus is a very large lambeosaurine hadrosaur (estimated around 10.8 m (36 ft) long), known from a partial skull (Holotype: CUST J-V1251-57 (Changchun University of Sciences and Technology, Changchun, Jilin Province, China)) found in the Late Maastrichtian Yuliangze Formation, west of Jiayin village, Heilongjiang Province, northeastern China.

Adult and juvenile hadrosaur remains discovered in the same area and formation likely represent the same taxon and supply information on most of the postcranial skeleton; the femur length was up to 1.35 m. (4.5 ft).

The partial skull resembles that of Parasaurolophus and probably had a similar long, backward-projecting hollow crest, indicated by the highly modified dorsal surface of the frontal bones.

Charonosaurus is one of the largest hadrosaurs currently known from Asia and indicates that lambeosaurines survived till the very end of the Cretaceous (lambeosaurines are not known from the Late Maastrichtian in North America).....wikipedia.org

Saurolophus, left, Shang Dynasty piece, right. Click and Drag Photo to resize. .

Saurolophus (pronounced /sɔˈrɒləfəs/, meaning "lizard crest") is a genus of large hadrosaurine duckbill that lived about 70 million years ago, in the Late Cretaceous of North America (Canada) and Asia (Mongolia); it is one of the few genera of dinosaurs known from multiple continents.

It is distinguished by a spike-like crest which projects up and back from the skull. Saurolophus was a herbivorous dinosaur which could move about either bipedally or quadrupedally.

The type species, S. osborni, was described by Barnum Brown in 1912. The other valid species, S. angustirostris, lived in Asia, and was described by Anatoly Konstantinovich Rozhdestvensky. A third species is considered dubious.

As a hadrosaurid, Saurolophus would have been a bipedal/quadrupedal herbivore, eating a variety of plants. Its skull permitted a grinding motion analogous to chewing, and its teeth were continually replacing and packed into dental batteries that contained hundreds of teeth, only a relative handful of which were in use at any time.

Plant material would have been cropped by its broad beak, and held in the jaws by a cheek-like organ. Its feeding range would have extended from the ground to ~4 meter (13 ft) above. Common S. angustirostris would have been an important large herbivore in the Nemegt Formation, but S. osborni was rare in the Horseshoe Canyon Formation and faced competition from other duckbills (Edmontosaurus and Hypacrosaurus).

Crest

Parasaurolophus, left, Shang Dynasty piece, middle and parasaurolophus right. Click and Drag Photo to resize. .

The distinctive spike-like crest of Saurolophus has been interpreted in multiple ways, and could have had multiple functions. Brown compared it to the crest of a chameleon, and suggested it could provide an area for muscle attachment and a connection point for a nonbody back frill like that seen in the basilisk lizard. Peter Dodson interpreted similar features in other duckbills as having use in sexual identification.

Maryańska and Osmólska, noting the hollow base, suggested that the crest increased the surface area of the respiratory cavity, and helped in thermoregulation.[4] James Hopson supported a function as a visual signal, and further mentioned the possibility that there were inflatable skin flaps over the nostrils that could have acted as resonators and additional visual signals.

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