Posts Tagged ‘ancient city discovered’

Previously Undiscovered Ancient City Found on Caribbean Sea Floor

s8int.com, Sophistication of Ancestors, The Flood of Noah, Unexplained Artifact | Posted by Chris Parker
Dec 17 2009

By Jes Alexander on December 9, 2009
(Herald de Paris)

WASHINGTON, DC (Herald de Paris) – EXCLUSIVE – Researchers have revealed the first images from the Caribbean sea floor of what they believe are the archaeological remains of an ancient civilization.

Guarding the location’s coordinates carefully, the project’s leader, who wishes to remain anonymous at this time, says the city could be thousands of years old; possibly even pre-dating the ancient Egyptian pyramids, at Giza.

The site was found using advanced satellite imagery, and is not in any way associated with the alleged site found by Russian explorers near Cuba in 2001, at a depth of 2300 feet.

“To be seen on satellite, our site is much shallower.” The team is currently seeking funding to mount an expedition to confirm and explore what appears to be a vast underwater city.

“You have to be careful working with satellite images in such a location,” the project’s principle researcher said, “The digital matrix sometimes misinterprets its data, and shows ruins as solid masses. The thing is, we’ve found structure – what appears to be a tall, narrow pyramid; large platform structures with small buildings on them; we’ve even found standing parallel post and beam construction in the rubble of what appears to be a fallen building.

You can’t have post and beam without human involvement.”

Asked if this city is the legendary city of Atlantis, the researchers immediately said no. “The romanticized ideal of Atlantis probably never existed, nor will anyone ever strap on a SCUBA tank, jump in the water, and find a city gateway that says, ‘Welcome to Atlantis.’ However, we do believe that this city may have been one of many cities of an advanced, seafaring, trade-based civilization, which may have been visited by their Eurocentric counterparts.”

It is unknown at this time how the city came to be on the sea floor, and not on dry land. “We have several theories.”

The team hopes to conduct a massive mapping and research expedition, to learn as much as possible about who these people were, before turning the site over to the Caribbean island’s home government.

“Whatever we’ve found does not belong to us,” the project’s leader said, “It belongs to the people of this island, and to the world at-large. If any pieces are brought to the surface, they belong in the hands of a museum.”

The project team asks that for more information, or to find out how to help fund their research, please contact the Herald de Paris’ publisher, Jes Alexander, at a specially set-up telephone number: 415-738-7811.

Original Source with Additional Photos

See also: Underwater City Off Cuba 1/2 Mile Down–2001

Peru’s Lost City Is a Natural Formation, Experts Rule

Science, Sophistication of Ancestors, Uncategorized, Unexplained Artifact | Posted by Chris Parker
Jan 06 2009

Stone formations in the Peruvian Andes that were recently claimed to be the possible ruins of the ancient city of Paititi are now thought to be naturally occurring phenomena, officials say.

Photographs courtesy Peru Instituto Nacional de Cultura

PRIOR STORY
Ancient “Lost City” Discovered in Peru, Official Claims…Kelly Hearn
for National Geographic News

January 16, 2008

Ruins recently discovered in southern Peru could be the ancient “lost city” of Paititi, according to claims that are drawing serious but cautious response from experts.

The presumptive lost city, described in written records as a stone settlement adorned with gold statues, has long been a grail for explorers—as well as a lure for local tourism businesses.

A commonly cited legend claims that Paititi was built by the Inca hero Inkarri, who founded the city of Cusco before retreating into the jungle after Spanish conquerors arrived.

On January 10 Peru’s state news agency reported that “an archaeological fortress” had been discovered in the district of Kimbiri and that the district’s mayor suggested it was the lost city.

Mayor Guillermo Torres described the ruins as a 430,000-square-foot (40,000-square-meter) fortification near an area known as Lobo Tahuantinsuyo.

Few other details about the site were offered, but initial reports described elaborately carved stone structures forming the base of a set of walls.

The state media report quotes Torres as saying the area will be “immediately declared” a cultural tourism site.

Officials from the Peruvian government’s Cusco-based National Institute of Culture (INC) met with Torres on Tuesday, according to Francisco Solís, an INC official.

“It is far too early to make any definitive judgments,” Solís told National Geographic News. “We are going to dispatch a team to investigate.”

Officials expect more details to emerge in the near future