Were Ancient Sea Monsters Actually Mythological or Did the Ancients Actually See Monsters? An E-Book-Let

Posted by Chris Parker
Sep 02 2009

by Chris Parker, Copyright 2009

Photo: This sea monster is actually an ancient bronze candelabra nicknamed “the sea monster”.

Excerpt

“Curiously, ancient dragon depictions closely match those of dinosaurs and pterosaurs which supposedly became extinct millions of years before man even “evolved”. Could the same be said for certain ancient “sea monster” depictions? Did ancient depictions also closely match those of ancient marine reptiles-which supposedly also became extinct before man came on the scene?
On the left is a Greek, bronze protome (animal figure) from a candelabrum
from around . 500-450 B.C.”

Excerpt

“The skulls of plesiosaurs have a fairly noticeable feature in the top directly behind the eye socket or orbit. This feature is on the upper part of the skull and is either a depression or a hole and it extends over the width of the skull. The feature is called the supratemporal fenestra, meaning upper, temporal fenestre; temporal related to temples and fenestra from the Latin meaning window.

The question for those artists depicting the plesiosaurus skull is; how specifically will they draw the skull over the supratemporal fenestra–will the feature disappear in their drawing, covered in flesh in a way that renders the feature non-apparent or, will they draw the skull with an obvious depression or other feature that makes this “skull window” noticeable?”

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