Archive for October 16th, 2007

Satellites Witness Lowest Arctic Ice Coverage in History

s8int.com, Science, Uncategorized, Unexplained Artifact | Posted by Chris Parker
Oct 16 2007

The area covered by sea ice in the Arctic has shrunk to its lowest level this week since satellite measurements began nearly 30 years ago, opening up the Northwest Passage – a long-sought short cut between Europe and Asia that has been historically impassable.

In the mosaic image above, created from nearly 200 images acquired in early September 2007 by the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) instrument aboard ESA’s Envisat satellite, the dark gray colour represents the ice-free areas while green represents areas with sea ice. Leif Toudal Pedersen from the Danish National Space Centre said:

“We have seen the ice-covered area drop to just around 3 million sq km which is about 1 million sq km less than the previous minima of 2005 and 2006. There has been a reduction of the ice cover over the last 10 years of about 100 000 sq km per year on average, so a drop of 1 million sq km in just one year is extreme.

“The strong reduction in just one year certainly raises flags that the ice (in summer) may disappear much sooner than expected and that we urgently need to understand better the processes involved.” Arctic sea ice naturally extends its surface coverage each northern winter and recedes each northern summer, but the rate of overall loss since 1978 when satellite records began has accelerated.To Read the Entire Article from ESA News, Click Here

Cliff Paiva, an Imaging Specialist and Friend of s8int.com Forwarded this article. His own views on the “Global temperature increase” is featured here. His BLOG is located here.