Big Bang’s Afterglow Fails an Intergalactic Shadow Test

Posted by Chris Parker
Sep 03 2006

 

In a finding sure to cause controversy, scientists at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) found a lack of evidence of shadows from “nearby” clusters of galaxies using new, highly accurate measurements of the cosmic microwave background.

A team of UAH scientists led by Dr. Richard Lieu, a professor of physics, used data from NASA’s Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) to scan the cosmic microwave background for shadows caused by 31 clusters of galaxies.

“These shadows are a well-known thing that has been predicted for years,” said Lieu. “This is the only direct method of determining the distance to the origin of the cosmic microwave background. Up to now, all the evidence that it originated from as far back in time as the Big Bang fireball has been circumstantial.

“If you see a shadow, however, it means the radiation comes from behind the cluster. If you don’t see a shadow, then you have something of a problem. Among the 31 clusters that we studied, some show a shadow effect and others do not.”

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