Flavius Josephus . A Jewish historian (37 CE – circa 100 CE ) On Jesus Christ

Posted by Chris Parker
Feb 15 2006


For centuries Josephus’ works were more widely read in Europe than any book other than the Bible. They are an invaluable eye-witness to a momentous turning point in Judaism, Christianity, and Western civilization.

Josephus, Antiquities 18.63, probably in a Christian redaction
Tr. I. H. Feldman, Loeb Classical Library, vol. 9, pp. 49ff.

Greek Version

Re: Jesus Christ

“About this time there lived Jesus, a wise man if indeed one ought to call him a man.

For he was one who wrought surprising feats and was a teacher of such people as accept the truth gladly. He won over many Jews and many of the Greeks. He was the Messiah.

When Pilate, upon hearing him accused by men of the highest standing among us, had condemned him to be crucified, those who had in the first place come to love him did not cease.

On the third day he appeared to them restored to life. For the prophets of God had prophesied these and myriads of other marvellous things about him. And the tribe of the Christians, so called after him, has still up to now, not disappeared.”

Arabic Version:
The translation belongs to Shlomo Pines. See also James H. Charlesworth, Jesus Within Judaism.

“Similarly Josephus the Hebrew. For he says in the treatises that he has written on the governance of the Jews:

At this time there was a wise man who was called Jesus. And his conduct was good, and he was known to be virtuous.

And many people from among the Jews and the other nations became his disciples. Pilate condemned him to be crucified and to die.

And those who had become his disciples did not abandon his discipleship. They reported that he had appeared to them after his crucifixion and that he was alive; accordingly, he was perhaps the Messiah concerning whom the prophets have recounted wonders. “

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